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> 'Net filters "required" for all Australians, no opt-out
Reaper527
post Oct 17 2008, 05:47 PM
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http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20081...no-opt-out.html

this is completely unacceptable, and a new low for censorship from respectable nations.

QUOTE
Australia continues to ignore its own government-funded studies from 2006 that show ISP-level filtering to be ineffective and costly. The Australian government's disregard for those prior studies suggests that the driving force behind the current plan is more political than technical.


when will people realize government doesn't solve problems, it creates them. is personal responsibility that hard of a concept?
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JLord
post Oct 17 2008, 06:50 PM
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I hope that the pornography enthusiasts in Australia and elsewhere can unite and organize themselves to oppose these types of ridiculous proposals.
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Demo
post Oct 17 2008, 08:22 PM
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Australia: Home of Ridiculous censorship.
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Deus Ex Machina
post Oct 17 2008, 09:29 PM
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QUOTE (Reaper527 @ Oct 17 2008, 11:47 AM) *
this is completely unacceptable, and a new low for censorship from respectable nations.

Maybe if you moved to a civilized nation you wouldn't have these types of problems (yeah right). In the mean time go kill some abos about it lol
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Demo
post Oct 17 2008, 10:06 PM
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IIRC didn't Australia ban Fallout 1 and 2 because you can use drugs?

This post has been edited by Demosthenes: Oct 17 2008, 10:06 PM
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acow
post Oct 17 2008, 10:25 PM
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Sucks. Stupid.

Already talked with friends about setting up a VPN to avoid it. well done labor party. idiots.

/also want to go through the list of banned sites to see if there's anything good there...
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JLord
post Oct 17 2008, 10:44 PM
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QUOTE (Demosthenes @ Oct 17 2008, 04:06 PM) *
IIRC didn't Australia ban Fallout 1 and 2 because you can use drugs?


Australia also banned fallout 3 forcing them to change the names of drugs in the game. Apparently use of fictional drugs is allowed but reference to real drugs warrant banning the game...
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Bryan
post Oct 17 2008, 11:43 PM
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Absolutely stupid, will need to have a look at that banned list.

QUOTE (Demosthenes @ Oct 18 2008, 08:06 AM) *
IIRC didn't Australia ban Fallout 1 and 2 because you can use drugs?

It all comes from the fact that the Office for Film and Literature Classification wont allow an R18+ rating for video games. Currently the highest rating is MA15+ and when a game is deemed too violent or excessive, they either refuse classification for the game which effectively leads to a ban or ask the game developers to edit some sections of the game so it can meet the MA15+ requirements. It's all a load of bullshit. Most of the arguments come from people saying that video games are for children but a study on video gaming in Australia showed that the average age of a gamer over here is 28 (http://www.bond.edu.au/news/2007/200702-Gr...s-Industry.html, sorry that was the best link I could find).

I mean we have R rated movies, why not video games?

(The most recent game to be refused a classification was Silent Hill: Homecoming, but I think Atari will have an edited version out early next year)
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Russian
post Oct 18 2008, 01:27 AM
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i voted for the other side.


You should have too.
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acow
post Oct 18 2008, 01:42 AM
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Hah, cause the liberals are the bastion of free speech and freedom of information in this country, don't make me laugh...that's like relying on hitler to stop legislation on jew bashing...

They may need to legislate to pass this nonsense, so then we'll see what happens. If the liberals support it, which they very well could, cause they're the conservative fucktard party, we're fucked.

They might oppose it just to fuck up labor though, both leaders of the opposition have shown they care more about partisan politics while in opposition rather than actually fighting for truth or ideology, and if that happens, there's almost no chance they can get this through the house. Hopefully the greens will oppose, senator fielding will support (fundie fucktard) and xenephon will be irrelevent and sit on the fence or look to make a deal....

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Nalvaros
post Oct 18 2008, 02:03 AM
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Yes it sucks, its outrageous, and I've raised this topic before.

However, its not like there is much anyone can do about it.

The only people who are likely to know about this, or even care about this (geeks) are the same people who completely fail when it comes to pushing their political views and influencing politicians. We kind of saw that already with the IP laws that have come into play. Hollywood Vs Silicon Valley = Hollywood wins.

Not only that, the arguments they can put up against the legislation, while they may be legit are certainly not likely to inspire a passionate response from the wider population - indeed the very nature of this legislation lends itself to a rather populist slant "Protecting the kids". People who argue openly against this are just asking for ignorant idiots to brand them as pedophiles.

The only way this is going to be stopped is with widespread, vocal and prolonged opposition.

For example:

Outcomes Based Education in WA was scrapped only with widespread and vocal opposition from teachers, principals, their unions, academics, parents and to an extent students themselves. Not only that, this coalition of groups had to protest loudly for over a year to force the idiots in charge to scrap OBE. I think it amounts to something of a miracle that such a wide coalition of groups was able to maintain their vocal opposition for so long - suitably supported and covered by the media of course. (I'm also somewhat amazed that the politicians stuck to their policy for so long in the face of such widespread and vehement opposition from the public).

Also, the only way they were able to succeed was with the support of the media. After all, it seems that is pretty much the only way the public can communicate their views to political parties these days. Certainly you can't write to them since you'll actually be writing to a poor graduate who has been instructed to write a polite "Thankyou. Don't write back" message to anyone who writes in. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/dry.gif)
In other words the only way you can influence the politicians is by writing in to the newspapers and getting the current affairs programs to run a program on the topic.

That was on a topic most people are familiar. I think the chances of that happening on the topic of net filtering are exceedingly low.

This post has been edited by Nalvaros: Oct 18 2008, 02:14 AM
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Mr Beer
post Oct 18 2008, 02:03 AM
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I'm quite sure there are higher priority items the Government should be working on. I mean, I can't imagine a scenario in which this should take priority, but particularly at the moment you'd think they'd be it on hold and do something useful.
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Nalvaros
post Oct 18 2008, 02:36 AM
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Just found this article from a year ago. Yeah, it seems were screwed: both parties appear to support it.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070...initiative.html

Australia to spend $189 million on anti-porn tech initiative

By Ryan Paul | Published: August 14, 2007 - 09:11AM CT

Australia's prime minister John Howard and opposition leader Kevin Rudd revealed the Australian government's sweeping new $189 million anti-pornography initiative on Friday at an event hosted by the Australian Christian Lobby. During the presentation, which was broadcast to over 700 Australian churches, Howard discussed Christian values and described the government's latest costly plans for preventing pictures of naked people from clogging The Tubes.

Approximately $89 million will be used to establish Australia's National Filter Scheme, which will impose burdensome filtering requirements on ISPs and provide Australian citizens with free* access to PC-based Internet filtering software. The filtering systems will leverage the Australian Communications and Media Authority's official Blacklist, which is based on the country's National Classification Scheme. According to a statement issued on Friday by communications minister Helen Coonan, the Australian Communications and Media Authority is also evaluating plans to extend the Blacklist to include "terrorism and cyber-crime sites upon prescription by the Attorney-General."

Approximately $22 million will be spent on a broad "public awareness and education campaign" to inform parents of Internet safety issues, and another $11.7 million will be used to establish community outreach programs that will push "the Internet safety message" into thousands of schools. Additionally, the government plans to establish a consultative working group to find a "workable solution" to combat "the use of social networking web sites by predators to contact and groom children via the internet."

Only last year, the Australian government spent $116 million on a similar initiative, $93 million of which was used to provide free* Internet filtering software to families for a three-year period. At the time, Coonan said in a statement that the government's three separate studies on the efficacy of ISP-level filtering found "significant problems with content filter products operating at the ISP-level," and Coonan cited ease of circumvention and limited filtering control when arguing that ISP-level filtering isn't as effective as PC-based filtering. It is ironic that Australia's latest costly anti-pornography initiative leverages the same kind of ISP-level filtering technologies that were dismissed as inadequate only a year ago. One wonders what kind of improvements have been in the filtering technology field since then.
Proposal would impose jail sentences for possessing five or more pornographic movies

In related news, the Australian Parliament is evaluating a legislative proposal introduced by indigenous affairs minister Mal Brough that aims to impose extreme restrictions on pornography in the Northern Territory. The proposal is inspired by the Australian government's "Children Are Sacred" report, which discusses instances of child sexual abuse in the Northern Territories. Mal Brough's proposal, which is described as "draconian" by the New Zealand Herald, would implement a broad ban on X-rated films in the Northern Territory, and impose jail sentences for porn "trafficking" on those who are caught with five or more X-rated films even in instances where the pornographic products are not being distributed.

Although Mal Brough only aims to impose the restrictions and "trafficking" penalties on the Northern Territories, groups like the Australian Christian Lobby are calling for the proposed directive to be expanded nationally. "The Australian Christian Lobby, along with many other Christian and family groups is asking why the ban on X-rated pornography should only apply to Northern Territory indigenous communities," the Australian Christian Lobby said in a statement. "The problems of pornography aren't confined to these communities and the ban needs to extend Australia-wide. Don't all children need protecting?"
When did the family values lobbyists give up on parenting?

Australian political action groups like the Australian Christian Lobby that claim to promote family values undermine their own platform by calling for government intervention that usurps the most basic family value of all: parenting. No government-sanctioned filtering solution will ever be a reliable replacement for direct parental involvement.

In light of the failings of the government's previous filtering program, and Prime Minister Howard's decision to present his new anti-pornography initiative at an event sponsored by the Australian Christian Lobby, it seems likely that this has more to do with appeasing a powerful faction of constituents than with protecting children. It's too bad that ISP-level filtering will get dragged into this, because unless Australia has found the perfect system (and we're sure they haven't), this means that plenty of headaches and false positives await.

Wouldn't it be more practical and effective for groups like the Australian Christian Lobby to use its resources to mobilize a grass-roots open-source software development project to create truly free filtering software that could then be broadly distributed to the public on the Internet and through community churches?
* Contrary to common belief, government services aren't actually free, they are provided at the expense of the taxpayer.

----------------

Outrageous..... perhaps we should have a law that states politicians who propose stupid laws like this and those politicans who support them should be jailed for 1 year (per ridiculous proposal). Thats a law I'd support more than this one at the moment.


This post has been edited by Nalvaros: Oct 18 2008, 02:38 AM
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Reaper527
post Oct 18 2008, 04:31 AM
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QUOTE (Nalvaros @ Oct 18 2008, 03:03 AM) *
Certainly you can't write to them since you'll actually be writing to a poor graduate who has been instructed to write a polite "Thankyou. Don't write back" message to anyone who writes in. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/dry.gif)


i wrote a letter to my state rep a year ago, and didn't even get that in response. i got an automated email responder, and that was it. the letter was about this story/case http://www.xbox-scene.com/xbox1data/sep/EE...uFykjQKHQAM.php , essentially they went after modchip dealers, and the letter i wrote urged for legal protection for legitimate modding usage, such as homebrew games and xbmc. (and incase anyone is wondering, there is a difference between the way i would write a politician and the way i would write on a forum. everything was grammatically correct and had common man explanations of anything technical)

anyone know if the australian banned sites list is public? i'd be curious to see the list
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Ralph Wiggum
post Oct 18 2008, 06:02 AM
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QUOTE (Mr Beer @ Oct 17 2008, 10:03 PM) *
I'm quite sure there are higher priority items the Government should be working on. I mean, I can't imagine a scenario in which this should take priority, but particularly at the moment you'd think they'd be it on hold and do something useful.

Wow. A government out there actually found a way to do something more stupid than throw 850 billion dollars at people who screwed up. I am disappointed.
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bigboy
post Oct 18 2008, 05:58 PM
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QUOTE (Brunstgnägg @ Oct 18 2008, 01:02 AM) *
Wow. A government out there actually found a way to do something more stupid than throw 850 billion dollars at people who screwed up. I am disappointed.

No, this is less stupid than throwing 850 billion dollars at people who screwed up. About $849 billion less stupid.
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Y2A
post Oct 18 2008, 06:25 PM
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damn so does this mean you guys aren't going to be able to get porn anymore? I mean there must be someway to buypass that.
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Nalvaros
post Oct 19 2008, 03:02 PM
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Sastan is in the pits on this one. He lives in the Northern Territory after all.
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acow
post Oct 27 2008, 03:02 AM
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QUOTE
The Opposition said it would most likely block any attempts to introduce the controversial mandatory ISP filtering policy, so the Government would need the support of Senator Fielding as well as the Greens and Senator Nick Xenophon to pass the legislation.


A bit of light through the darkness...

Who knew, sometimes partisan politics is a good thing (IMG:style_emoticons/default/tongue.gif)
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Russian
post Oct 27 2008, 03:55 AM
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acow -> its bad, very bad.

senator fielding thinks the current system proposed isnt strict enough
QUOTE
Family First Senator Steve Fielding wants hardcore pornography and fetish material blocked under the Government's plans to filter the internet,


What would you expect from the bible reading family first. The greens will pass this legislation as soon as the government promises to implement kyoto or protect some old growth forest. Xenophon is irrelevent.

The sad thing is is that australia has a history of restrictive censorship. In the past they have banned books that where widely available in the rest of the world for decades. The government will pass this legislature and there will be hardly any opposition because most of this country is full of sheeple. In all the countries in the world that i have been in, Australians are the most likely to respect authority and sit idly while their rights are taken away.
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Reaper527
post Oct 28 2008, 09:12 PM
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http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20081...banned-too.html

looks like there is an update. as russian said, this fielding guy wants to add legal content to the mandatory censor list.

QUOTE
The statement indicates that any material rated above R 18+ (including X 18+ and "refused classification") would fall under the mandatory blacklist and could not be accessed through any Australian ISP. Such material is currently legal for Australian adults.


its a slippery slope they are playing on, and if they aren't careful, they are going to fall out of relevance.
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